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Olive Wood Standing Jerusalem Cross With Soil From Bethlehem


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Olive Wood Standing Jerusalem Cross With Cross From Bethlehem.

$32.50$44.99

Olive Wood Standing Jerusalem Cross With Soil From Bethlehem

Special attention is given to detailing every inch of this hand-carved cross. The rich color and interesting veins are characteristic of the beautiful Bethlehem Olive Wood and it contains soil from Bethlehem the birth place of Jesus. This cross was completely hand carved by the artisan of Christmas House factory in Bethlehem, The Holy Land.

This cross available in three sizes you can choose the size you like.


Meaning Of Jerusalem Cross

The Jerusalem cross or The Holy Land cross, also known as Crusaders’ cross or the “Five-fold Cross”, is a heraldic cross or Christian symbol consisting of a large cross potent surrounded by four smaller plain crosses, one in each quadrant. It is not to be confused with the Lorraine cross, which has also been called the “Jerusalem cross”. There are variants to the design, also known as “Jerusalem cross”, with either the four crosslets also in the form of Crosses potent, or conversely with the central cross also in the form of a plain cross.

The design originates with the coat of arms worn by Godfrey of Bouillon during the First Crusade, and it remained in use as the arms of the King Of Jerusalem throughout their duration (1099–1291).

The symbolism of the five-fold cross is variously given as the Five Wounds of Christ, Christ and the four quarters of the world, or Christ and the four evangelists. The arms of the King of Jerusalem featured gold on silver, a metal on a metal, and thus broke the heraldic Rule of Tincture; this was justified by the fact that Jerusalem was so holy, it was above ordinary rules. The gold and silver were also connected to Psalms 68:14, which mentions a “dove covered in silver, and her feathers with yellow gold”. The symbolism of five crosses representing the Five Wounds is first recorded earlier in the 11th century, with the consecration of the St Brelade’s Church under the patronage of Robert of Normandy (before 1035); the crosses are incised in the church’s altar stone.

The Latin Empire of 1204–1261 used an extended variant of the Jerusalem cross, where each of the four crosslets was itself surrounded by four smaller crosslets (a “Jerusalem cross of Jerusalem crosses”).

In late medieval heraldry, after the failure of the Crusades, the Crusader’s cross was used for various Crusader states. The 14th-century Book of All Kingdoms uses it as the flag of Sebastia. At about the same time, the Pizzigano chart uses it as the flag of Tbilisi (based on the latter example, the Crusader’s cross was adopted as the flag of Georgia in 2004).

Carlo Maggi, a Venetian nobleman who had visited Jerusalem and was made a knight of the Order Of the Holy Sepulcher in the early 1570s, included the Jerusalem cross in his coat of arms.

There is a historiographical tradition that Peter the Great flew a flag with a variant of the Jerusalem cross in his campaign in the White Sea in 1693.

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